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  1. Welcome to E-Auction 41

    C ontretemps—an unusual word that I have never found a use for in opening notes for a coin/medal catalog, until now. Usually anything that merits minting metal is of some significance. The protests of some disgruntled theater fans over two centuries ago ...

  2. Welcome to E-Auction 40

    C oins can take us to many different places—some unusual, some historic, some long-gone. This summer catalog has several numismatic vistas we have not offered any, or at least much of, before. The California Pioneer Fractional Gold coinage came about for ...

  3. Welcome to E-Auction 39

    H ere is the latest in our ongoing series of E-Auctions that began with the arrival of Lief and his digital skills in 2012. We designed the print versions to be less expensive to produce and sized to qualify for the least expensive First Class Mail ...

  4. MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS – An “Ambitious” Irregular Ryal

    It was an ill-advised marriage—Mary Stuart and Henry Lord Darnley. As the son of Margaret Douglas, granddaughter of Henry VII, Darnley was in the line of succession for the English throne, as was Mary Stuart whose grandmother was a sister of Henry VIII. ...

  5. Welcome to Auction 40

    O ur personal introduction to our catalogs usually launches right into talk about what you can find in these pages. I want to start somewhere else this time—discussing a few of the past owners of these pieces who deserve our thanks for the care they gave ...

  6. Welcome to E-Auction 38

    Something old, something new… J anuary is a time to revisit a few things from past auctions that failed to find homes. We have examined them closely and repriced most of them. Look for some worthwhile ancient coins. And I confess to sometimes reaching for ...

  7. Welcome to E-Auction 37

    I t all started with cattle. If you wanted to barter, you could just herd your payment over for the trade. Oxen were the standard for barter before the Greeks found that refining and minting precious metals at standardized weights and fineness was a much ...

  8. Welcome to E-Auction 36

    I n a time when coin shows have disappeared it seems just right to offer a collection that was formed from coins bought at coin shows by a very serious collector. Freeman Craig Sr. was an Army Air Force navigator who flew 50 missions from North Africa ...

  9. Welcome to E-Auction 35

    T he value of numismatic gold is based on two separate markets—the bullion market and the numismatic market. Other than for common silver coinage—typically of very little numismatic interest—this is the one area where price is determined from two ...

  10. Welcome to Auction 39

    O ur 39th major auction is a long way from our first such sale in April of 1993. We began by noting “We have been publishing fixed price catalogs…for well over two decades. We are excited about assembling and publishing our first major bid sale.” Well, we ...

  11. Welcome to E-Auction 34

    W elcome to another decade! Marnie and I have been reminiscing…. The last ten years have seen momentous changes in our lives, as we welcome grandchildren, and as we continue to experience the remarkable remaking of our business by our son and partner Lief ...

  12. Welcome to E-Auction 33

    In 2002 we sold a collection of 229 Greek electrotypes for $12,500. A few years ago we were asked by a serious collector who remembered that lot if it might be for sale if he offered twice the amount it realized in 2002. The current owner said no. This ...

  13. The Only Silver Coin Issue for Nearly Half of the British 18th Century

    The “Northumberland” shilling is more a story of the energetic and influential Hugh Percy, an important figure in the court of George II, than it is of a lone silver coin issued in limited numbers—3000 or fewer—in the midst of a period of nearly a half ...

  14. Welcome to E-Auction 32

    Watching numismatic auctions while sitting at my desk allows me to get a feel for the coin market that used to require days of travel and substantial expense. While I cannot view the lots themselves and thus can readily miss the subtle characteristics ...

  15. Welcome to E-Auction 31

    The Birth of the Gothic Florin. Victoria had a long reign, a concluding article in a year-long series on England’s silver coinage in the 1924 Spink Numismatic Circular notes. Thus, while “there were a considerable number of designs for the coinage, ...

  16. Welcome to E-Auction 30

    A smattering of interesting gold coinage opens our sale. Most have served their original marketplace purpose, and now they have become an affordable collectible. A bit of ancient and medieval, a bit of British and world, and several more US gold type ...

  17. Welcome to E-Auction 29

    You will find variety in our spring sale. Opening bids from $16 to $5000. Gold coinage, interesting and affordable classics, including early Greek electrum, an early Islamic trade coin, an affordable Nero aureus, a pretty Byzantine scyphate, a choice ...

  18. Welcome to Auction 38

    Old collections, old memories of the coins we sold many years ago, and of collectors, fellow enthusiasts sharing the wonder of numismatics… A large portion of this catalog has come from collectors we have known, some repositioning their focus; others ...

  19. Welcome to E-Auction 28

    This is our fifth E-Auction for 2018. With well over 900 lots offered in E-Auctions and 390 lots in our major February sale, a small company that publishes just over 1300 lots in a year sounds a bit modest—this in an era where large auctions with ...

  20. Elizabeth I Shillings

    Shillings were a Tudor innovation that began with the coinage reform under Edward VI. The reign of Elizabeth saw the denomination expand in scope and complexity to meet the ongoing challenges of coinage for local economies and expanding international ...

  21. Welcome to E-Auction 27

    Many American coin collectors began as youngsters assembling date sets. They soon recognized that 20th Century US coins had some fascinating varieties—the three-legged buffalo was one, and the piece offered here is the first I have ever had. Even though ...

  22. Welcome to E-Auction 26

    By the time this sale closes the mid-August ANA Convention will be over. Lief and Allan will be there for a couple of days. Mid-August would have been the logical time for this sale to close but the additional couple of weeks allows you a bit more time to ...

  23. Welcome to E-Auction 25

    Tiny coins, large coins, and a fair number in between.… Coins come in a wide range of sizes. When you limit yourself to coins made to circulate, you narrow the range a bit. This catalog covers a wide range, from tiny Greek fractionals to what became an ...

  24. Welcome to E-Auction 24

    What is it about gold? The stability of the metal? Its beauty, particularly since designers have almost always given their best attention to their work with it? Its relationship to an economy generally, whether it was ancient gold, medieval, Renaissance ...

  25. Aftersale: A Second Chance

    It all comes together in a few hours on one day—the months of acquisition, cataloging, preparing, printing, watching, answering queries—and then it is all over. Few processes in business (and perhaps in life) provide such finality. My day started early as ...

  26. The Confederate Catholic Rebel Crown

    Lot 279 Plain, crude, uneven strike, rugged—why its appeal? What is its story? Of the five siege crowns issued in Ireland during the English Civil War, this piece is remarkable because of its religious connection. The 2006 sale of Lucien LaRiviere’s ...

  27. Welcome to Auction 37

      Quality, Variety, Value   A year of planning, searching, and preparing have gone into this catalog. For this once-a-year sale we search out the most interesting, important, exciting things we can find to offer you. This is a “collector’s sale.” We ...

  28. Tournai

    (Lots 142-144) Tournai, one of Belgium’s oldest cities, sits about fifty miles southwest of Brussels, its history reflecting the forces that flowed back and forth across Europe for centuries. For a while, it was claimed by Henry VIII.  England captured it ...

  29. The Ormonde Siege Coinage of 1643-1644

    Royalist issue in Ireland during The Great Rebellion (Lots 263-278) Why so many varieties and next to no efforts to classify the types? I have been puzzling over this ever since we began working with Bruce Ormond’s collection.  You can see the result ...

  30. Voce Populi Copper Halfpenny Tokens

    A fascinating and enigmatic copper issue from the mid-1700s in Ireland (and Colonial America?) (Lots 291-303) Voce Populi coppers have appeared in several references on Colonial American coinage: The Official Redbook, A Guidebook of United States Coins ...

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How Bidding Works

 

Davissons Ltd uses a soft close for its auctions, which means no lot closes until everyone is done bidding. Every time a bid is placed within the final 40 seconds of a lot closing, the timer is reset to 40 seconds. This continues until no bids are placed for 40 seconds, at which point the lot closes. There will never be more than one lot closing at once, as the next lot is not allowed to begin closing until the current lot closes.

To bid: enter your maximum bid into the text box, and click submit. Only round dollar amounts are accepted. You are then required to confirm your bid. Once confirmed, all bids are final. If you have placed a bid in error you must call during office hours and speak to one of us. If you are the current high bidder then it will display “Current High Bidder: YOU” If you are not the high bidder, or if you are not logged in, then the current high bidder will be identified by their 5 digit client ID. You may find your client ID under the Account tab.

Bids are reduced automatically, so feel free to bid your maximum and it will be reduced to one increment over the current high bid. If a user places a bid that is higher than necessary to be the current high bidder on the lot, the displayed bid will reflect one advance over the next lower bid. For example, if a user "A" places a bid of $120 on a lot which opens at $100, "A" will be winning that lot at $100. If another user "B" bids $110, the winning bidder will be "A" at $120, one advance over the supporting bid of $110. If user "B" in this example instead placed a bid at $120, then user "A" will still be winning at $120 because they placed that maximum bid value first.

Increments can be viewed here. The next bid will always be on the next increment, so if a user is winning a lot at $100, or $105, or $109, the next bid will still always be $110.

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