News Archive

Results per page:

Search results

Pages

  1. Coinage of the Roman Senate under the Ostrogoths

    101.jpg T he Roman Senate issued this bronze follis long after the Rome that ruled so much of the known world had disappeared, sometime in the AD 512-522 period, during the reign of Anastasius in the East. The coin with its image of Roma on the obverse ...

  2. Welcome to E-Auction 44

    Exchange, making change, storing value—if one wants a simple definition of what coins are for, this comes close. In ancient times gold was highly valued and sought after and was an important metal for trade. But trading with gold was a complex process. ...

  3. Welcome to E-Auction 43

    Pricing coins fairly so that the values accurately reflect fair values is an important and demanding part of preparing each catalog. We could open everything at zero, the way most US coins are auctioned. But there are daily price guides for US coins and ...

  4. Welcome to Auction 41

      O ur annual major sale marks the final result of a year of planning, selecting, acquiring, and soliciting material from this fascinating realm of numismatics. It all comes to a conclusion just as one calendar year ends and another begins. Many of the ...

  5. Welcome to E-Auction 42

    ‘Twas a dark and stormy time….”  We received an unusual consignment for this sale—a group of United States coins minted in 1853. All the gold issues (the first $3 gold piece was issued in 1854), and a choice large cent. I became fascinated by what must ...

  6. Welcome to E-Auction 41

    C ontretemps—an unusual word that I have never found a use for in opening notes for a coin/medal catalog, until now. Usually anything that merits minting metal is of some significance. The protests of some disgruntled theater fans over two centuries ago ...

  7. Welcome to E-Auction 40

    C oins can take us to many different places—some unusual, some historic, some long-gone. This summer catalog has several numismatic vistas we have not offered any, or at least much of, before. The California Pioneer Fractional Gold coinage came about for ...

  8. Welcome to E-Auction 39

    H ere is the latest in our ongoing series of E-Auctions that began with the arrival of Lief and his digital skills in 2012. We designed the print versions to be less expensive to produce and sized to qualify for the least expensive First Class Mail ...

  9. MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS – An “Ambitious” Irregular Ryal

    It was an ill-advised marriage—Mary Stuart and Henry Lord Darnley. As the son of Margaret Douglas, granddaughter of Henry VII, Darnley was in the line of succession for the English throne, as was Mary Stuart whose grandmother was a sister of Henry VIII. ...

  10. Welcome to Auction 40

    O ur personal introduction to our catalogs usually launches right into talk about what you can find in these pages. I want to start somewhere else this time—discussing a few of the past owners of these pieces who deserve our thanks for the care they gave ...

Pages

 

How Bidding Works

 

Davissons Ltd uses a soft close for its auctions, which means no lot closes until everyone is done bidding. Every time a bid is placed within the final 40 seconds of a lot closing, the timer is reset to 40 seconds. This continues until no bids are placed for 40 seconds, at which point the lot closes. There will never be more than one lot closing at once, as the next lot is not allowed to begin closing until the current lot closes.

To bid: enter your maximum bid into the text box, and click submit. Only round dollar amounts are accepted. You are then required to confirm your bid. Once confirmed, all bids are final. If you have placed a bid in error you must call during office hours and speak to one of us. If you are the current high bidder then it will display “Current High Bidder: YOU” If you are not the high bidder, or if you are not logged in, then the current high bidder will be identified by their 5 digit client ID. You may find your client ID under the Account tab.

Bids are reduced automatically, so feel free to bid your maximum and it will be reduced to one increment over the current high bid. If a user places a bid that is higher than necessary to be the current high bidder on the lot, the displayed bid will reflect one advance over the next lower bid. For example, if a user "A" places a bid of $120 on a lot which opens at $100, "A" will be winning that lot at $100. If another user "B" bids $110, the winning bidder will be "A" at $120, one advance over the supporting bid of $110. If user "B" in this example instead placed a bid at $120, then user "A" will still be winning at $120 because they placed that maximum bid value first.

Increments can be viewed here. The next bid will always be on the next increment, so if a user is winning a lot at $100, or $105, or $109, the next bid will still always be $110.

Close
Connected Disconnected