Printed Auction 42

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Closing March 1, 2023
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  1. Winning Losing Won Lost Watching Available in aftersale  
    A42, Lot 228:

    190 Barbarous radiates and 4 Claudian copies.

    A Window into the Dark Ages

    Patrick Zabel pursued “barbarous radiates” with passion and intensity for several decades.

    His collection, each numbered and with gram weight to three decimal points, diameter, an epsilon value (? any insight appreciated) and many with a brief descriptive notation on the front of the holder, notes about find locations, design characteristics, regular issues imitated, metal, etc.— constitutes a meticulous research project on this extensive “local coinage” of the late Roman Empire in Britain and the Continent. (190 pieces plus four Claudian copies.) (His copy of the 1949 ANS , by Philip V. Hill, is included with this lot.)

    Small and often seemingly insignificant knock-offs of regular Roman coinage fueled day-to-day life in Britain and the European continent in the late days of the Roman Empire. “Barbarous radiates” is the somewhat derogatory term applied to these small bits of local coinage that show up in hoards from the fourth and fifth centuries. With Roman control over its empire declining, the imperial coinage that had served day-to-day life became increasingly scarce and local efforts to provide small change filled in for the lack of official currency.

    According to Philip Hill, author of the 1949 ANS monograph on the topic, these pieces were often considered of marginal interest in hoard finds and frequently “thrown aside as useless for the purpose of dating hoards and sites.” But he contends that the design elements of these hastily produced pieces reflected the period in which they were produced. So, despite their crudeness and irregularity, they provide valuable hoard dating information as well as unofficial insight into a period of political disarray.

    A single paragraph in the one volume work on Roman coins by David Sear describe these pieces as sometimes “almost as good as the originals, but most are very crude productions with badly blundered legends and almost unrecognizable types.” Hill talks about the many ways they were made—flans made by “flattening hot globules of metal, by overstriking complete coins, orthodox or barbarous, without first erasing the original types, by filing away types of regular coins, or by cutting them into quarters, or roughly rounded fragments…and by hammering out and cutting up coins of still larger module prior to restriking.”

    This collection generally emphasizes high grade pieces with more recognizable designs on flans that tend to be round. The holders have notations about purchase sources, find locations, design characteristics, regular issues imitated, metal, and occasional other observations. The writing on the holders represents many hours of work and the overall quality makes this a fascinating and highly desirable group of pieces from an era full of uncertainty and mystery.

    The Zabel Collection.

  2. Winning Losing Won Lost Watching Available in aftersale  
  3. Winning Losing Won Lost Watching Available in aftersale  
    A42, Lot 235:

    Electrotype of English hammered coinage. Kings of Mercia. Offa. 757-796. Penny electrotype. 17 mm. The BMC coin weighs 19.5 grains. First series. His bust right, curled hair; OFFA REX / Cruciform pattern; +A Λ R E∂ in extensions from the central compartment which contains a small cross; floral elements between the limbs. BMC Vol I:9. Plate V:3. (this piece illustrated). Also, plate coin for Standard Catalog editions from 1962 until 2007). S. 454 (1962-1977). S. 905 (current). As made.

    Electrotypes of Anglo-Saxon and English coins in the British Museum (joined into a double thick single piece). Many were used for the Standard Catalog prior to 2007.

    These double-thick electrotypes of British Museum Anglo-Saxon and English hammered coins are direct copies of pieces in the British Museum and can be seen in the plates of the the two BMC volumes issued in 1887 and 1893: Keary & Poole, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume I, and Grueber & Keary, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume II.

    These copies were used for the production of the reference that has become the standard for English coins, the Spink Standard Catalog. (Prior to 1998 the publication was known as the Seaby Standard Catalog.) Many of the pieces offered here are the pieces photographed for the annual catalogs from the small format 1962 edition until the major revision in the 42nd edition in 2007, when the catalog changed from black and white to color.

    Prior to the larger size publications that began with the much expanded and renumbered 16th edition in 1978, the earlier editions beginning in 1962 were smaller 5 by 7 ½ inch books. Earlier still, prior to 1962 the publications were larger and thinner with drawings rather than photographs illustrating the coins.)

    The electros are apparently extremely rare if not generally unique. I have seen a very few examples of other types in this format being offered but never a duplication of any offered here. (AD)

  4. Winning Losing Won Lost Watching Available in aftersale  
    A42, Lot 236:

    Electrotype of English hammered coinage. Kings of Mercia. Cynethryth, widow of Offa, 796. 757-796 (Offa). Penny electrotype. 17 mm. Moneyer: Eoba. BMC coin, 19.7 grains. Her bust right, hair in long curls; EOBA in front / T with a bar above in the center in a circle of pellets; CYNEDRYD around. BMC Vol I:61. Plate VIII:3. (this piece illustrated). Also, plate coin for Standard Catalog editions from 1962 until 2007). S. 458 (1962-1977). S. 909 (current). As made.

    Electrotypes of Anglo-Saxon and English coins in the British Museum (joined into a double thick single piece). Many were used for the Standard Catalog prior to 2007.

    These double-thick electrotypes of British Museum Anglo-Saxon and English hammered coins are direct copies of pieces in the British Museum and can be seen in the plates of the the two BMC volumes issued in 1887 and 1893: Keary & Poole, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume I, and Grueber & Keary, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume II.

    These copies were used for the production of the reference that has become the standard for English coins, the Spink Standard Catalog. (Prior to 1998 the publication was known as the Seaby Standard Catalog.) Many of the pieces offered here are the pieces photographed for the annual catalogs from the small format 1962 edition until the major revision in the 42nd edition in 2007, when the catalog changed from black and white to color.

    Prior to the larger size publications that began with the much expanded and renumbered 16th edition in 1978, the earlier editions beginning in 1962 were smaller 5 by 7 ½ inch books. Earlier still, prior to 1962 the publications were larger and thinner with drawings rather than photographs illustrating the coins.)

    The electros are apparently extremely rare if not generally unique. I have seen a very few examples of other types in this format being offered but never a duplication of any offered here. (AD)

  5. Winning Losing Won Lost Watching Available in aftersale  
    A42, Lot 237:

    Electrotype of English hammered coinage. Hiberno-Norse Vikings in England. Eric Bloodaxe. First reign, 948. Penny electrotype. 21 mm. Two line type penny. York. Central cross pattee, inner circle; +ERIC REX EFOR+ around / Four pellets in an approximate diamond shape top and bottom; RADV +++ ΓEMO in three lines. BMC I: 1009. Plate XXIX:11 (this piece illustrated). S. 564 (pre 2007). S. 1028 (current). As made.

    Electrotypes of Anglo-Saxon and English coins in the British Museum (joined into a double thick single piece). Many were used for the Standard Catalog prior to 2007.

    These double-thick electrotypes of British Museum Anglo-Saxon and English hammered coins are direct copies of pieces in the British Museum and can be seen in the plates of the the two BMC volumes issued in 1887 and 1893: Keary & Poole, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume I, and Grueber & Keary, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume II.

    These copies were used for the production of the reference that has become the standard for English coins, the Spink Standard Catalog. (Prior to 1998 the publication was known as the Seaby Standard Catalog.) Many of the pieces offered here are the pieces photographed for the annual catalogs from the small format 1962 edition until the major revision in the 42nd edition in 2007, when the catalog changed from black and white to color.

    Prior to the larger size publications that began with the much expanded and renumbered 16th edition in 1978, the earlier editions beginning in 1962 were smaller 5 by 7 ½ inch books. Earlier still, prior to 1962 the publications were larger and thinner with drawings rather than photographs illustrating the coins.)

    The electros are apparently extremely rare if not generally unique. I have seen a very few examples of other types in this format being offered but never a duplication of any offered here. (AD)

  6. Winning Losing Won Lost Watching Available in aftersale  
    A42, Lot 238:

    Electrotype of English hammered coinage. Kings of Wessex. Aethelstan. 975-978. Penny electrotype. 22 mm. BMC type iv. York (The BMC piece weighs 22.0 grains). Small cross pattee; +AEDEL STAN REX / A line across the center, a building (church?) above; EB •R ΛC ΛC in two lines above the central line; REGNAID MON in two lines below. BMC Vol II:6. Plate IX:2 (this piece illustrated). S. 629 (pre 1978) S. 1101 (current). As made; exceptional toning.

    Electrotypes of Anglo-Saxon and English coins in the British Museum (joined into a double thick single piece). Many were used for the Standard Catalog prior to 2007.

    These double-thick electrotypes of British Museum Anglo-Saxon and English hammered coins are direct copies of pieces in the British Museum and can be seen in the plates of the the two BMC volumes issued in 1887 and 1893: Keary & Poole, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume I, and Grueber & Keary, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume II.

    These copies were used for the production of the reference that has become the standard for English coins, the Spink Standard Catalog. (Prior to 1998 the publication was known as the Seaby Standard Catalog.) Many of the pieces offered here are the pieces photographed for the annual catalogs from the small format 1962 edition until the major revision in the 42nd edition in 2007, when the catalog changed from black and white to color.

    Prior to the larger size publications that began with the much expanded and renumbered 16th edition in 1978, the earlier editions beginning in 1962 were smaller 5 by 7 ½ inch books. Earlier still, prior to 1962 the publications were larger and thinner with drawings rather than photographs illustrating the coins.)

    The electros are apparently extremely rare if not generally unique. I have seen a very few examples of other types in this format being offered but never a duplication of any offered here. (AD)

  7. Winning Losing Won Lost Watching Available in aftersale  
    A42, Lot 239:

    Electrotype of English hammered coinage. Kings of Wessex. Aethelstan. 975-978. Penny electrotype. 22 mm. BMC x, variety a. York (The BMC coin weighs 22.7 grains). Bust left in high relief; ÆDELSTΛN REX (retrograde) around / A small central cross pattee; +OEONEETREBL+ around (retrograde). (Ecberht or Rotberht?). BMC Vol II:17. Plate IX:5 (this piece illustrated). S. 629a (pre 2007) S. 1102 (current). As made; superb toning.

    Electrotypes of Anglo-Saxon and English coins in the British Museum (joined into a double thick single piece). Many were used for the Standard Catalog prior to 2007.

    These double-thick electrotypes of British Museum Anglo-Saxon and English hammered coins are direct copies of pieces in the British Museum and can be seen in the plates of the the two BMC volumes issued in 1887 and 1893: Keary & Poole, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume I, and Grueber & Keary, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume II.

    These copies were used for the production of the reference that has become the standard for English coins, the Spink Standard Catalog. (Prior to 1998 the publication was known as the Seaby Standard Catalog.) Many of the pieces offered here are the pieces photographed for the annual catalogs from the small format 1962 edition until the major revision in the 42nd edition in 2007, when the catalog changed from black and white to color.

    Prior to the larger size publications that began with the much expanded and renumbered 16th edition in 1978, the earlier editions beginning in 1962 were smaller 5 by 7 ½ inch books. Earlier still, prior to 1962 the publications were larger and thinner with drawings rather than photographs illustrating the coins.)

    The electros are apparently extremely rare if not generally unique. I have seen a very few examples of other types in this format being offered but never a duplication of any offered here. (AD)

  8. Winning Losing Won Lost Watching Available in aftersale  
    A42, Lot 240:

    Electrotype of English hammered coinage. Kings of Wessex. Eadmund. 939-946. Penny electrotype. 22 mm. The BMC coin weighs 24.0 grains. Type i. Small cross patee; +EADMVND REX around / Moneyer's name in two lines across, crosses between the letter, three pellets in triangle above and below; DOMEN +++ CESMO. BMC Vol II:41. Plate XI:3. (this piece illustrated) S. 631 (1962-1977). S. 1105 (current). As made.

    Electrotypes of Anglo-Saxon and English coins in the British Museum (joined into a double thick single piece). Many were used for the Standard Catalog prior to 2007.

    These double-thick electrotypes of British Museum Anglo-Saxon and English hammered coins are direct copies of pieces in the British Museum and can be seen in the plates of the the two BMC volumes issued in 1887 and 1893: Keary & Poole, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume I, and Grueber & Keary, A Catalogue of English Coins in the British Museum, Anglo-Saxon Series Volume II.

    These copies were used for the production of the reference that has become the standard for English coins, the Spink Standard Catalog. (Prior to 1998 the publication was known as the Seaby Standard Catalog.) Many of the pieces offered here are the pieces photographed for the annual catalogs from the small format 1962 edition until the major revision in the 42nd edition in 2007, when the catalog changed from black and white to color.

    Prior to the larger size publications that began with the much expanded and renumbered 16th edition in 1978, the earlier editions beginning in 1962 were smaller 5 by 7 ½ inch books. Earlier still, prior to 1962 the publications were larger and thinner with drawings rather than photographs illustrating the coins.)

    The electros are apparently extremely rare if not generally unique. I have seen a very few examples of other types in this format being offered but never a duplication of any offered here. (AD)

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